How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Quartz Watch

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Quartz Watch

When my deeper interest in watches first began, it was largely at the influence of a few local friends of mine who taught me about mechanical watch movements, and got me excited about the concept of wearing a watch. That led to the purchase of my first mechanical (A Seiko SKX009), and for the few years following that, all I was interested in purchasing watch wise was mechanical pieces. In fact, I not only preferred mechanical, I sneered at quartz watches. I couldn't fathom why someone would want one over a living, beating mechanical movement. 

However, the last three watches I've purchased, have all been quartz based watches, and I find myself being interested in acquiring even more quartz pieces. Within the past month I've bought a G-Shock GWX-5600C-7JF, Citizen Aqualand, and Breitling Aerospace. I was drawn to those three pieces in particular because of the amazing functions that each piece offers. The G-Shock (which happens to be nearly the same model that the creator of G-Shock wears) offers the capability to track the tides, moonphase, worldtime/dual time zone, stopwatch, timer, alarm, all while syncing to the atomic clock up to 6 times per day. That's awesome. I'll admit, I don't have a lot of need to know the tide information here in Tennessee, nor the moon phase, but they make for a cool visual.

The Citizen Aqualand is an older model from Citizen (mine was made sometime during the 1980's), and represented a lot of firsts for both diving and watches. Mounted to the side of the case, slightly resembling a tumor, is a depth gauge. When put into diving mode, the digital display will show your depth, alert you if you're ascending too quickly, and a few other handy diving features. When not in diving mode, you're able to use the digital display for the date, second time zone, chronograph, and alarm. 

And last, but certainly not least, my most recent acquisition: The Breitling Aerospace. The example I picked up is from 1993, and measures in at around 40mm, as opposed to the modern Aerospace's which are MUCH larger. The Aerospace is cased in titanium, with a titanium bracelet. On wrist, you could easily forget that you've got it on at all. Like the Aqualand, the Aerospace features an analog/digital style face, and offers a lot of functionality. The Aerospace provides day/date, a second time zone, chronograph, timer,  and alarm. 

What has drawn me to these quartz watches is the incredible functionalities that each one offers, features that you would not get on a single mechanical watch. In my heart, mechanical watches still reign supreme, however I've learned to stop worrying and love quartz watches as well. And you should too. #quartzproud

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