Muyshondt Maus Review

Muyshondt Maus Review

 The current Maus lineup available from Muyshondt 

The current Maus lineup available from Muyshondt 

Ever since I got into EDC gear, I’ve been searching for the perfect daily carry flashlight. I’ve cycled through a handful of lights throughout the past few years, but I always managed to find some sort of flaw, and replaced it with another contender. However, I think my search for the perfect light is over.

    I’m sure that my criteria for a daily carry light aren’t the same as everyone’s, but for reference, here’s what I look for in a daily carry light: small size, lightweight, twist activation, moderate output, and battery life. Of course, we obviously all want quality output and battery life, so let me explain a little further. What I’m looking for is an output level that allows me to accomplish daily flashlighty tasks, without the need to blind people or participate in lumen pissing contests. In addition, I want the output to be paired well with the battery so that one evening of heavy use doesn’t lead to me having to replace the battery. The various lights I’ve tried always managed to fall short in at least one category. However, I’ve found a light that I think might be the one: The Muyshondt Maus.

    Enrique, the owner of Muyshondt Enterprises, was kind enough to let me test out one of the prototype Mk1 Maus’ in aluminum over the past few months (thanks Enrique), and I’ve been continually impressed by it. Let’s get some technical specifications out of the way; the Maus comes in at 53.25mm long (2.1 in), by 14.5mm in diameter (0.57 in), and my Aluminum version weighs in at 28 grams (1 ounce).

 

 

The Maus is a particularly attractive light, and its style is unlike anything else I’ve seen. The body of the light has a simple milling pattern, and a small strip of knurling to aid with activating the switch. The Maus was designed by Enrique to be a keychain light, however I’ve never been a fan of carrying a light in that fashion, so I’ve opted to carry it loose in my pocket, with a lanyard tied to the back.

From talking with Enrique, all of his lights, particularly the Maus, are focused on one main trait: Efficiency. In a market that is dominated by a highest lumen count pissing contest, Muyshondt lights exist in a world where lumens and battery life play together well. While you’re not going to wow anybody by shining your Maus around in the park, you also won’t have to change the battery after a night of such shenanigans. For the approximate 6 months that I’ve been testing and carrying this Maus, I’ve been using the same battery. That’s impressive.

 

In addition to the efficiency, my aluminum Maus has proven to have just about the perfect output for my daily flashlight usage, which usually entails looking for something under the seats in my car, charging up watch lume, and plugging in cords behind my desk. However, I imagine many of you have a similar use case. And since I don’t need the ability to blind others, or give indian burns with overdone knurling, the Maus fits right into what I was looking for.

That’s not to say that the Maus is without its downsides. For those not carrying it on their keychain, the knurling at the front isn’t of much use to aid in activating the light. I’ve mostly opted to actuating the light with two hands. Again due to it’s small size, and my not carrying it on a keychain as intended, I found that I had to add a lanyard to the light to make it comfortable to hold onto, as well as aid in finding and pulling it out of my pocket. The threads on my prototype are rather tight, which led me to add grease to them to make the light easier to actuate; however on the production versions I handled, this same tightness was not present. And that’s it. Over the past 6 months, those are the largest grievances I have with this light.

 

The Maus represents the smallest light in the current Muyshondt lineup. Those interested in the Maus, but wanting a slightly larger size, push-button activation, and a higher output might opt to look at the Aeon. And those wanting an even larger light with a MUCH higher output might want to look into the Flieger. No matter which model you go with, I have no doubt that you will be very happy with your selection.

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